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National Cervical Cancer Coalition


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 1:56 am 

Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 6:16 pm
Posts: 370
Quote:
Why can't blood be tested for HPV?


Well HPV never enters your bloodstream so you wouldn't find any active virus there. You may be able to find antibodies to HPV in general...but at best that would tell you that at some point in that persons life they were exposed to HPV (which can cause all warts including hand and feet) So that test would be useless as everybody on the planet will be exposed to some form of HPV in their lives.

I find it interesting that so many people are insisting that the FDA and the CDC approve a test for men who have the virus, but these same people seem to refuse to accept that these same agencies have deemed HPV to be a largely transient infection that rarely causes any long term health trouble in men. If you'll trust their word that there even exists a test for HPV at all then why wouldn't you trust that they have the information about HPV clearance and medical risk right as well? I don't know about any of you, but I for one haven't seen the DNA involved or developed a vaccine for the disease. I would think it would be a safe bet that they have and know the risks.

I agree that it would be great to have a test, but only inasmuch as I would like to be aware of my health status and raise awareness overall for Gardasil and the benefit that providing a vaccine and a faster treatment (or cure) for men and women could provide. The idea of HPV itself doesn't concern me at all, at best it's a minor skin condition that should clear with time and at worst it's a rare risk for a cancer that's highly treatable. All things considered if the worst thing that ever happened to me was HPV I would feel lucky.

I know it's easy to panic and freak out when you have to deal with any unknown factor in your lives. Believe me I wasn't so calm about HPV when I first found out about it. But in time you'll start to realize that you are still here and your life will go on with or without any intervention from the FDA.


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PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 8:01 am 
Site Admin

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:) Nice post!

Fredo

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 12:30 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:00 pm
Posts: 56
Greatful,

Just my two cents -- please don't refer to hpv as a rare risk for cancer that's highly treatable. I was recently diagnosed with Stage 0 cervical cancer (and yes, I always got my annual paps). I've been through one LEEP and may be facing another surgery in the future to remove even more of my cervix. People seem to think that removing chunks of a woman's reproductive organs is no big deal, but when it's your body that's constantly being mutilated, it gets old really quick. I'd prefer that this disease become "treatable" in the future by the development of therapeutic vaccines to actually assist the body in combating the virus.

As far as testing in men, I think there is definitely a need for it. Most of the oncologists I have seen said that I would further complicate my problems by sleeping with my partner since it would most likely expose me to an even higher viral load. Sure, the virus probably won't affect him, but it's still a threat to me. Even if the test wasn't completely accurate, I'd still like to be able to see if something could be found on him.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:43 am 

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 8:44 am
Posts: 11
Daphne wrote:
Greatful,

Just my two cents -- please don't refer to hpv as a rare risk for cancer that's highly treatable. I was recently diagnosed with Stage 0 cervical cancer (and yes, I always got my annual paps). I've been through one LEEP and may be facing another surgery in the future to remove even more of my cervix. People seem to think that removing chunks of a woman's reproductive organs is no big deal, but when it's your body that's constantly being mutilated, it gets old really quick. I'd prefer that this disease become "treatable" in the future by the development of therapeutic vaccines to actually assist the body in combating the virus.

As far as testing in men, I think there is definitely a need for it. Most of the oncologists I have seen said that I would further complicate my problems by sleeping with my partner since it would most likely expose me to an even higher viral load. Sure, the virus probably won't affect him, but it's still a threat to me. Even if the test wasn't completely accurate, I'd still like to be able to see if something could be found on him.


Exactly.

And the jury is still out on the problems in men. There have been few if any studies on how HPV affects men. There are a lot of problems with men's reproductive organs that have no known cause, like with the prostate. Until studies prove that HPV is or isn't the cause of something, then the CDC should stop promoting that HPV causes no health problems with men other than warts. They simply don't know.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:29 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:00 pm
Posts: 56
I completely agree. And besides the other types of cancer in causes in women's reproductive systems and orally for both men and women, I have heard that they're starting to suspect it as a cause of some lung and breast cancers. Creating a therapeutic vaccine for this virus would make a huge leap in cancer treatment.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2009 12:50 am 

Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 10:01 pm
Posts: 89
I second Daphne that cervical cancer is not "a rare risk for a cancer that's highly treatable". All of these terms to me are totally objectionable - the fact that it is preconceived as a "rare risk" might be in relation to the fact that such a large percentage of the population have HPV but only a small percentage develop cervical cancer. But, one cannot forget that prior to routine pap smears, cervical cancer was one of the top killers of women. Not cancer-related causes of death, but causes of death overall. We also cannot forget that many millions of women in third-world countries do not have access to routine paps and that cervical cancer still remains a top killer for these women.

Also, the term "highly treatable" causes me pause as well. True, cervical cancer may have an overall 5-year survival rate higher than that of most other cancers, but highly treatable makes it sounds like a piece of cake. Women still die when diagnosed with Stage 0. There is no 100% 5-year survival rate that I am aware of for any stage of cervical cancer.

I truly believe that until another form of common cancer is linked to HPV that effects BOTH sexes, that there will not be too much progress made in developing a therepudic vaccine. That, or if penis cancer begins to be more common. If men had to endure what women did in regards to cervical cancer (or pre-cancer) with their penises I could guarantee that a cure would be found pronto. Nothing like a bunch of guys having chunks of their penis removed to speed up science! Sorry to rant, maybe I've had one too many glasses of wine tonight.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:27 pm 

Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:00 pm
Posts: 56
And, I'll agree with you again, OFG. ;) If women unwittingly carried a sexually transmitted virus that did to men what it does to women, there is no way there wouldn't be testing to find it on females. "Oh, we'll just slice off a part of your reproductive organ and cauterize it so it won't bleed too much" wouldn't fly for men. I don't mean to sound like a man-hater, because I'm not at all, it's just that the unfairness of this virus, or rather treatment of it, really gets to me sometimes.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:18 am 

Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 8:44 am
Posts: 11
Men need to be tested. Period. Allowing men to carry HPV with no way to test or treat is a huge disservice to women.

Contact Sen. Tom Coburn and tell him your story. He's also a doctor and lectures about STDs. As a Congressman, if he hear's enough personal stories, maybe he can begin a movement to find a solution that can help.

http://coburn.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactSenatorCoburn.Home


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:58 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:22 pm
Posts: 9
pavemagd wrote:
I'm a male and I was just tested for HPV in a private clinic in Taipei.
They took samples of cells by swabbing the skin. non intrusive, doesn't hurt. Now they send it to the lab. They use PCR + Auto-sequencing method to identify the HPV genotype and virus burden. I have no clue why this test is not available in the west. it's ashame I would say.


Hi Pavemagd,

Can you give me information about where you were tested? I am a male and was recently exposed to high risk HPV. I am interested in being tested, but am having extreme difficulty finding a U.S. doctor to test me, although the technology exists to sample and test men for high risk HPV.

I would really appreciate any information you could provide. This is weighing heavily on me.


Last edited by hpv123 on Mon Dec 07, 2009 6:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 6:09 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:22 pm
Posts: 9
infostd2008 wrote:
Hey pavemagd,

Would greatly appreciate it if you could tells us what continent you are on and what State and City you were tested in and the results of the hpv test that they performed on you as soon as there in ok.


Quote:
Posted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 5:45 pm Post subject:
I'm a male and I was just tested for HPV in a private clinic in Taipei.
They took samples of cells by swabbing the skin. non intrusive, doesn't hurt. Now they send it to the lab. They use PCR + Auto-sequencing method to identify the HPV genotype and virus burden. I have no clue why this test is not available in the west. it's ashame I would say.


Hi Infostd2008,

I see you had some dialogue with Pavemagd regarding his being tested for HPV. I am a male who was recently exposed to high risk HPV and am very interested in being tested, but have had no luck so far finding someone to test me. Do you know of any doctors who will test men for high risk genital HPV? Were you able to get any useful information from Pavemagd about the clinic where he was tested?

Thanks so much.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 6:18 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:22 pm
Posts: 9
boonieboy wrote:
In for answer from Fredo. :)


Hi Boonieboy,

I saw that you had some discussion with Pavemagd about his being tested for high risk HPV. Were you able to find out the name of the clinic/doctor that tested him? I am a male who was recently exposed to high risk HPV. I have had no luck so far finding a doctor to test me. If you were able to get any useful information from Pavemagd about where he was tested or if you know of any doctors in the U.S. who test men for high risk genital HPV please let me know.

Thanks a lot.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 1:09 pm 

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:18 pm
Posts: 3
Location: Kansas City
I’m male, and in my 30’s. My doctor recently diagnosed me as having HPV-16 (high-risk) after seeing the lab results taken using a swab from what looked like an abnormal, slightly raised area of skin (best way to describe it - I was worried it may be a genital wart). There was no biopsy done, and only a swab specimen taken superficially. After asking, I was told that the test method used was "HPV Type-Detect 2.0 By Bio-Plex Analysis" by MDL Laboratories (www.mdlab.com). I called MD Lab, and they too confirmed that HPV testing can be done on men, as long as there is an abnormal area (wart, lesion, etc) to swab from. However, the following websites say that there is currently no method that exists for testing HPV in men:

1. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fact ... isk/HPV#q7 (question # 7, last line, says "There are currently no approved tests to detect HPV infections in men.")
2. http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-and-men.htm (The section "Is there a test for HPV in men?" section says "Currently, there is no test to find HPV in men. The only approved HPV tests on the market are not useful for screening for HPV-related cancers or genital warts in men")
3. http://www.ashastd.org/hpv/hpv_learn_men.cfm (The section "How are men screened for HPV?" says "there is no specific way to test directly for HPV in men that is approved for clinical use.")
4. http://www.thehpvtest.com/about-hpv/faq ... st-for-men (says “There is currently no FDA-approved test to detect HPV in men. That is because an effective, reliable way to collect a sample of male genital skin cells, which would allow detection of HPV, has yet to be developed.”)

MDL and my doctor confirmed it can be done (it is a DNA test), and is indeed an accurate method used to test for HPV in men (even though it might not be FDA approved) and all strains of HPV are detectable in men (high-risk, or low-risk). I'm not sure why the official health websites are saying that testing in men is not possible, but my doctor said that it could be that it is still in the process of being approved.

Does this help?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2011 1:23 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Hi loopyk75,

Thanks for your post. HPV testing does indeed exist for men, but no test is FDA approved for clinical, "real world" use at present. Doesn't mean it can't be done, just that nothing has an official sanction or a specific indication. This is for a couple of reasons, the first being that sampling the male genital skin has historically been trickier and less accurate than with specimens taken from females. That may be less true now, as researchers have been looking at new and better ways to take genital skin samples from men. FYI the reason it's not as easy with men is because the male genitalia has thicker, more heavily keratinized skin (keratin is a structural protein found in the outer layer of skin, and a key component of hair and nails) compared with women.

The other reason is that men are less likely to experience an HPV-related disease than women, so testing for the virus has less utility in terms of helping health care providers determine who's at risk, how to manage them, etc., which is how HPV testing is used for females (remember that even with women, HPV testing isn't routinely used simply as a check of her infection status; it's part of cervical cancer screening specifically). You can see, though, why some men would want to have HPV testing done, and how it might really be useful in some cases. Just curious, what are they wanting to do with you in terms of follow-up?

Best,
Fredo

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:22 pm 

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:18 pm
Posts: 3
Location: Kansas City
The follow-up question is a great one, Fredo. As of now, nothing! In fact, I asked for Aldara to be prescribed to me and the doctor thought it was unnecessary because of the pain and scarring that it can leave. So as of now, I'm only doing the home Apple Cider Vinegar treatment that I have read about on many forums, and it has worked like a charm. The main thing that MDL said to me was that they can only test in men as long as there is a lesion to swab from. So if an "abnormal area" does not exist then they cannot detect the HPV strain.

My worry is about approaching future partners about this. How do I proceed? I'm afraid no person would want to be with someone with a known STI, and my conscience wouldn't let me just withhold the truth. I'm completely in a dilemma.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 13, 2011 4:02 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Quote:
My worry is about approaching future partners about this. How do I proceed? I'm afraid no person would want to be with someone with a known STI, and my conscience wouldn't let me just withhold the truth. I'm completely in a dilemma.


Yeah, this comes up a lot, and it's hard to know just what to say to a partner. First, it's important to know that virtually all sexually active individuals (which is pretty much everybody) will have one or more HPV infections in their lives, it's just that very few are actually diagnosed. In most cases, HPV is cleared by the immune system in a year or two (sometimes not that long). There's no set time-frame in which this has to happen, though. It makes sense to talk about HPV with a new partner you might have while lesions are present, or sometime after. It seems unfair to suggest you need to talk about this with each and every partner the rest of your life, say, even those you might be with a couple of years after the last episode of lesions.
Talking points might include:

*HPV is very common (almost everyone gets it at some point)
*Most cases are not harmful
*It's usually cleared naturally, although this can be unpredictable in a given case

I hope this helps!
Fredo

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