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National Cervical Cancer Coalition


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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 4:53 pm 

Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 4:38 pm
Posts: 8
I've read in many places, that a person usually clears HPV in less than 2 years. While it's helpful to know this, it isn't that helpful for my situation. I'm looking for a different statistic.

I learned I was positive for high-risk HPV in 2006. I believe I must have had the virus for at least 2 years when I was diagnosed. I had one negative HPV test in 2007. I had normal paps after that until this Feb. I had an abnormal pap and tested positive for high-risk HPV. I have no reason to believe this is a new infection.

Is there a chance I will ever clear this virus? Does the fact that it's been 5+ years since I contracted it mean that I will periodically have abnormal paps for the rest of my life?

I read somewhere that about 0.5 to 0.75% of people with chronic hepatitis C spontaneously clear the virus. I don't suppose anyone knows this figure for HPV. I'm healthy and have no reason to believe my immune system is compromised. I need to cling to hope that I can still clear this!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:04 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Hi JennyKimmy,

Thanks for posting. It's unlikely you'll continue to have abnormal Pap tests forever, but I can't predict specifically how this might run its course. Most women with persistent HPV infections are not at great risk of serious diseases developing, and if you stay on top of your Pap tests like you seem to be doing, the risks of cervical cancers developing (or even significant precancers, really...) are slight.

If treatment for cell changes is needed at some point, that might actually give your body a boost in clearing the virus. HPV persistence can be influenced by factors that include age, genetics, nutrition, HPV type, viral load, and so on.

I hope this helps.

Best,
Fredo

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