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PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:25 am 

Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:24 am
Posts: 31
Location: Asia
I know some of us here have been loitering around and we start posting but no one actually replies because...

Good news is that some people are cured and free from HPV...

Bad news would be that some are too busy dealing with their own life and with HPV to post on this topic...

Or just busy to post here.

I'll make an effort to post. For those who didn't read my topic, my story in short would be, I'm currently 25 years old. I have HPV on my lips and penis. Well, I had it once on my lips but for some reason, there's a recurrence today when I went to check it out. Same goes for my penis. I was free from HPV for 1-2 months and I thought I would get lucky, but hell, it came back. I got it from my ex-girlfriend, 2 years ago. I had genital warts at the age of 23. So it's 2 years and I'm still battling it with hopes.

So I had the warts inside my cheek and on my lips frozen today, and my shaft had a stop that was frozen too. I exercise on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays (or as frequently as I can). I take fruits after lunch to keep my body healthy. I don't smoke, I stopped drinking. So I'm just hoping it'll clear itself. It's a tough battle, I have an underlying condition, with is a heart condition and the doctor said that it might be that condition that is causing the slow progress in battling HPV.

I have a girlfriend but I'm also worried about spreading it to her, especially when we kiss. So...no kisses for me these 2 weeks. It's heart breaking but my current girlfriend knows about my condition and she understands. She's also giving me the support I need. We refrain from having sex in case I screw up someone's life like what my ex-girlfriend did (she cheated on me with a drug addict. I'm just thankful it isn't AIDS or HIV, but I'm still unhappy it is an STD).

Sooo...if you need someone to listen to you and reply and stuff, I'll do my best and reply to you on a daily basis. I felt a need to help people with HPV because I'm a victim of HPV as well. Also because I know how tough it is to be facing such problems so I just wanna be here for the people whom I'm able to be here for.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 10:10 pm 

Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 9:57 pm
Posts: 15
Location: US
Good post man.

I come here infrequently, giving updates from time to time, but I'm pretty much in the same position as you. 1.5 yrs since diagnosed, probably 2 to 2.5 since I've noticed the symptoms (at the time was in a relationship for a couple years). One thing I'm curious about, because I'm often faced with the dilemma, is how you got into the relationship you are in now. I keep dodging relationships and even dating because I just can't get comfortable with entering a relationship knowing I have HPV. I'm pretty much trying to tough it out until it clears up (doctor appointment coming this week for a 6 month checkup since my first laser surgery...which was a year after a bunch of other non-laser treatments). Just a shitty place to be and not a place I want to bring anyone else into because if I had a choice I wouldn't be here either.

Anyway, figured I'd just chime in here. Good luck, and hang in there...guess it's all we can do. Just feels a lot tougher doing it on my own for this long, it has to be a pretty big relief to have a shoulder to lean on with your current girlfriend. I'm strong on my own, but the whole last relationship and this HPV ordeal on top of it has definitely knocked the legs out from underneath me.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2011 8:54 am 

Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:24 am
Posts: 31
Location: Asia
I didn't know if she'd understand what it is. I guess it depends on the individual and the girl herself. At first, I got rejected. She feared. But it's normal, I didn't blame her. We still go out, talk, go to movies. Then one day, it just happened. I asked her again, and she said "Yes". I asked her if she's afraid, she said she is but her feelings for me is stronger than her fear. We didn't have sex, just kissing and cuddling. So for a year now, that's what we have been doing. She's keeping it until after marriage, I, who have unfortunately lost it to my ex, am stuck with HPV.

If you find someone you really want to spend your whole life with, just go for it. Be prepared to be rejected and don't feel bitter. Don't blame yourself, don't blame God (I'm Atheist but whatever), don't blame your ex. In fact, don't blame anything. The more time you spend blaming something and wondering what or who to blame, the longer your warts will heal. It's a good sign for me, I had a few outbreaks, but each outbreaks have lesser warts. I was 1-2 months wart-free, and I thought I was gonna beat it when BAM, it came back.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:26 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Psychosocial Reactions: Men and HPV
Originally published in HPV News
(c) ASHA 2010

To subscribe visit http://www.hpvnews.org/ (free throughout 2011)

Because of cervical cancer, HPV research understandably focuses more on women than men. Women deal with the bulk of HPV-related diseases and HPV tests are only approved for clinical use with females. Men aren’t totally removed from the equation, though. The approval in 2009 of Gardasil for use with males to treat genital warts, along with the increased understanding that the impact of HPV diseases in men who have sex with men (MSM) is not insignificant, means males are garnering more attention. This is highlighted in research presented at the 2010 STD Prevention Conference that examined the emotional impact of HPV in men.

One study, led by investigators from the Merck Research Institute, used detailed surveys to examine the psychosocial impact among both heterosexual man and MSM who had a variety of HPV-related diagnosis, including genital, anal, and penile warts and, among MSM participants, HPV-associated anal diseases (including precancerous cell changes). Both straight and gay men largely regarded genital warts as a “nuisance” but expressed a good deal of worry about relationships, including exposing a partner to HPV. Many of the subjects were also worried about beginning new sexual relationships after diagnosis. Recurrences were another area of concern.

Anal diseases were especially troubling among MSM, with subjects citing concerns about complications (like cancer) and many reporting depression and concerns about partners.

Another study, led by a team from the University of South Florida, assessed the emotional impact with subjects who were tested for HPV as part of a natural history study with men. The negative reaction of men with positive HPV tests was described by the authors as “generally low to moderate.” Compared to their counterparts who tested negative, men with positive HPV tests predictably were much more likely to report feeling concerned (62%), confused (36%), shocked or frustrated (32%). Similarly, those testing positive were also more prone to report feeling scared, guilty, depressed, or angry.

Men have many questions about HPV, and often express frustration over the lack of HPV educational materials directed to them. In response, ASHA has developed HPV resources based, in part, on our own research examining the most common queries from men who utilize our HPV contact centers. View our latest offering here.

References

Ellen Daley,Eric Buhl, Stephanie Marhefka, Cheryl Vamos, Chris Wheldon, and Natalie Hernandez. Males Receiving HPV Test Results: A Unique Opportunity to Assess Emotional Responses in Men. Oral presentation D3f at the 2010 STD Prevention Conference, Atlanta, GA.

T. Christopher Mast, Carla Demuro, Arthur Granger, and Stephen Goldstone. The Psychosocial Impact of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Related Interventions Among Heterosexual Men (HSM) and Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM). Poster presentation P191 at the 2010 STD Prevention Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Posted by Fredo

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:30 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Disclosing Genital Warts to a Partner
Originally published in HPV News
(c) ASHA 2008
To subscribe to to www.hpvnews.org (free throughout 2011)

Fearing rejection and judgment, the idea of discussing genital warts with a partner is understandably daunting. Wanting to be open with their partner but often dreading a negative reaction, the sense of obligation to disclose is often at odds with feelings of vulnerability.

But is it correct to assume someone will automatically react badly to learning a partner has genital warts? Research done by researchers in Britain finds that learning a sexual partner has been diagnosed with genital warts may not prompt the negative reaction many fear (For more see Disclosing Genital Warts to Partners in the June 2008 issue of HPV News).

Dr. Louise Scrivener, with the Department of Psychology at the University of London, and colleagues recruited patients with a history of genital warts who have had a sexual relationship since their diagnosis. The participants, all of whom were patients at a London medical clinic, completed questionnaires that assessed anxiety, perceptions of stigma around STIs, and relationship variables.

Just over two-thirds of the subjects reported informing partners of their diagnosis, for reasons such as honesty and a partner having a right to know. Those who chose not to disclose their diagnosis said their decision was largely driven by embarrassment and worry over a negative reaction. Such concerns might have been unfounded, however, as those who disclosed said partners responded much more positively than expected.

Dr. Scrivener chatted recently with HPV News about her study:

HPV News: From reading your study, it seems stigma didn’t play a significant role in a person’s decision whether or not to disclose their genital warts (GW) diagnosis. Were you surprised that stigma played such a small part?

Louise Scrivener: At first we were surprised. Much of the literature seems to assume that stigma is one of the key reasons people don’t tell their partners they have an STI. However, there has not been much research in this area, and the only research we found looked at people with HIV. While people with HIV who perceive higher levels of stigma do seem to tell fewer people overall that they are HIV positive, more detailed research found no such relationship between stigma and disclosure to partners (Derlega et al, 2002). It seems that other factors, in particular the quality of the individual relationship, are much more relevant to the disclosure decision than stigma perception.

Another trend you found was that those with increased stigma perception of GW were in fact more likely to disclose; I would have guessed this would lead someone to be relatively reluctant in bringing up the subject…

The trend towards higher stigma perception in disclosers is very interesting, although a larger study would be needed to see if it is a meaningful finding. We wondered if some people with low stigma perception might view GW as so commonplace and unremarkable that they are not worth mentioning. Maybe they don’t even think about telling their partners. Those people who perceive high levels of stigma are perhaps more likely to think it is important that their partners know.

How important is one’s knowledge of HPV in the decision to disclose or not?

We didn’t investigate whether knowledge about HPV was related to the disclosure decision, although it would be an interesting area to research. I think it is often assumed that people might find it easier to tell their partners if they know more about HPV and are therefore better able to answer their partners’ questions.

Disclosers versus disclosers had no great difference in expected outcome – what then motivated disclosers to tell?


We wondered if fear of a negative response from a partner might be enough to prevent disclosure in a casual relationship, but not in a longer-term relationship. Only 9% of the people who viewed their relationship as casual had told their partners compared with 81% who viewed their relationship as long term. In a long term relationship, perhaps the reasons in favour of disclosure become more important, for example the desire to be honest, the wish to avoid infecting the partner, and the belief that the partner has a right to know. Maybe these factors seem less important in a casual relationship.

Conversely, why do you think nondisclosers choose that path?

The main reasons given for not telling partners were embarrassment and fear of a negative response. However, our findings seem to suggest that most people in long-term relationships manage to overcome these worries and tell their partners. The good news is that, in our study, people who managed to tell their partners did not regret it and their partners tended to respond much more positively than expected

References:
Scrivener, L et al. Disclosure of anogenital wars to sexual partners. Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2008; 84(3): 179-182.
Derlega, V et al. Perceived HIV-related Stigma and HIV Disclosure to Relationship Partners after Finding Out about the Seropositive Diagnosis. Journal of Health Psychology. 2002; 7(4):415-432.

Posted by Fredo

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:32 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:08 pm
Posts: 2122
Location: North Carolina
Hi all,

Good discussions the last week or so. With that in mind, I've posted just above a couple of HPV News articles that seem to fit the topic. I hope they provide some insight. You can subscribe to HPV News at www.hpvnews.org and it's free for the remainder of 2011.

Best,
Fredo

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 7:57 am 

Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 9:24 am
Posts: 31
Location: Asia
Hi Fredo, just subscribed.

Edit: Added - I was wondering if there're developing any cure or something. I was at another HPV forum and Russia? was experimenting with using LED or something, here's the link, http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/219317.php

Also...are there any news on developing a cure for this or a way to exterminate the virus other than just surgery or liquid nitrogen and aldara etc? Something permanent. A lot of people are more affected with the appearance of a genital / oral wart and it's kinda depressing.


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