Overview

Donate today and support our programs




Sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs (sometimes called sexually transmitted infections, or STIs) affect people of all ages, backgrounds, and from all walks of life. In the U.S. alone there are approximately 19.7 million new cases each year, nearly half of which occur among youth ages 15-24 years.

Getting the facts about STDs/STIs and sexual health is increasingly important. We invite you to explore our website and learn more about specific STDs/STIs, tips for reducing risk, and ways to talk with health care providers and partners.

Have a question about sexual health or sexually transmitted infections? The ASHA STI Support Community, developed in partnership with Inspire, connects you with thousands of patients and caregivers in sharing personal experiences in a safe, secure environment. Visit the ASHA Inspire site and join today. 

STD or STI? What the difference?

Diseases that are spread through sexual contact are usually referred to as sexually transmitted diseases or STDs for short. In recent years, however, many experts in this area of public health have suggested replacing STD with a new term—sexually transmitted infection, or STI.

Why the change? The concept of “disease,” as in STD, suggests a clear medical problem, usually some obvious signs or symptoms. But several of the most common STDs have no signs or symptoms in the majority of persons infected. Or they have mild signs and symptoms that can be easily overlooked. So the sexually transmitted virus or bacteria can be described as creating “infection,” which may or may not result in “disease.” This is true of chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and human papillomavirus (HPV), to name a few.

For this reason, for some professionals and organizations the term “disease” is being replaced by “infection.” ASHA has used the term STD since 1988 and it appears in hundreds of published ASHA documents, including this site. Users of this site will continue to see it for some time. But in moving forward, you will also begin to see increased use of the term STI. We’re interested in your thoughts about this as well. Send us your thoughts at info@ashastd.org).

Estimated Annual STI Rates in the U.S.

STI Rates